Jeanne Claire van Ryzin

Jeanne Claire van Ryzin is an arts and culture journalist who has covered visual art, performance, film, literature, architecture, and just about any combination thereof. She was the staff arts critic for the Austin American-Statesman for 17 years. Her commendations include the First Place Arts & Culture Criticism Award from the Society for Features Journalism. Additionally, Jeanne Claire has been awarded professional fellowships at USC’s Western Knight Center for Specialized Journalism and NEA/Columbia University Arts Journalism Institute. In 2022, she was awarded the Rabkin Prize in visual art journalism. Jeanne Claire founded and led Sightlines, a non-profit online arts and culture magazine that reached an annual readership of 600,000. And for two years, she taught arts journalism at the University of Texas College of Fine Arts. Her writing has appeared in the New York Times, Architecture magazine, Dwell, the Review of Contemporary Fiction, Art Papers, and ICON design magazine, among other publications.

Graham Reynolds’ musical pastiche probes the myths of Pancho Villa

In an operatic song cycle, Graham Reynolds plums the constantly shifting portrait of a much revered hero

UT inaugurates new School of Design & Creative Technologies

The University of Texas at Austin inaugurated its new School of Design & Creative Technologies at a ceremony today. A new unit of UT's College of Fine arts, the school...

Ransom Center acquires Michael Ondaatje archive

When Michael Ondaatje wrote the Booker-winning novel "The English Patient" a random image of a drunken party, clipped from a magazine, proved to be the inspiration to a critical...

Waller Creek Conservancy breaks ground on Moody Amphitheatre

The Waller Creek Conservancy celebrated the official ground breaking of its $230 million project to transform a 1.5 mile stretch of the downtown creek into a high-design chain of...

City launches latest round of temporary art installations

The city of Austin has unleashed nine provocative and whimsical temporary art installations across the city. Started a few years ago, the TEMPO program commissions artists to create projects that...

Capturing Texas roadside vernacular architecture

Time was that roadside America didn’t look as homogenous as it does now. Make a stop today in your fuel-efficient car along any Interstate highway and you’re at a...