Our picks for PrintAustin 2018

Zoë Shulman, "The Allegory of Good and Bad Government" diptych; 2017. Courtesy the artist and Camiba Gallery.

It’s impressive that PrintAustin is now in its fifth year.

Founded by artists Cathy Savage and Elvia Perrin, the month-long celebration of all things printmaking is remarkably rich and strikes a perfect balance in being accessible to the general art audience and being rewarding for print nerds too.

Here’s my picks of the PrintAustin exhibits. There’s also a slew of workshops, artist talks and other events to check out too.

Jan. 12

The Flatbed complex, 2832 E. MLK, Jr. Blvd., hosts a quartet of exhibits all of which celebrate openings from 6 to 8 p.m. on Jan. 12.


Karina Noel Hean, “Tangled Up.”
  • “Man on Edge: Prints of James Surls” Most known for his sculpture, Surls is also a deft creator of wood-cut prints. Flatbed Press & Gallery
  • “Zoë Shulman: The Allegory of Good and Bad Government.”  Shulman uses elaborate symbology to express the virtues and vices of government in 20 hexagonal art works. Camiba Gallery
  • “Eva Claycomb: Last Time” Beguiling, humorously poignant illustrations from the artist’s latest zine. Respec Gallery.
  • “Strata: Karina Noel Hean.” Hean’s woodcut and intaglio prints are fabulous dense, swirling compositions. Gallery Shoal Creek.

Jan. 20

From “Gardening at Midnight” at the Georgetown Art Center.

“Gardening at Midnight.” We’d follow artist Jeffrey Dell anywhere, including to the Georgetown Arts Center where’s he uses the notion of secret moments as a curatorial premise for a group show. Opening 6-8 p.m. at Georgetown Art Center.

“The Contemporary Print.” UK artist Paul Laidler served as judge for PrintAustin’s grand group exhibition. Opening 6-8 p.m. at Flatbed Press & Gallery.

“ROUX Collective.” Artists Ann “Sole Sister” Johnson, Rabéa Ballin, Delita Martin and Lovie Olivia share interests in the genealogy, feminism, identity of women of the African Diaspora. Opening 6-9 p.m.  Prizer Arts & Letters.

Feb. 3

“Border/Promise.” San Antonio artists Kim Bishop, Paul Karma and Luis Valderas will lead the public in making a large-scale ‘border bandage’ of prints which they’ll hang over the section of Waller Creek that intersects the grounds of the Elisabet Ney Museum.

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