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August 17, 2022

Music

Opera at a drive-in movie theater? Yes, and it’s part of...

Austin Opera's first production of the 2020-2021 season won't be in the Long Center for the Performing Arts, but at the Blue Starlite Drive-in. Beginning...

Austin Opera returns to live performance — at the racetrack

Opera aficianados, start your engines. Austin Opera returns to live performance with a fully-staged production of Puccini’s "Tosca" at the massive Germania Insurance Amphitheater at...

Dan Welcher Leaves UT’s Butler School of Music After Sexual Misconduct...

Dan Welcher, a longtime University of Texas Butler School of Music composition professor, is leaving the university following multiple allegations of sexual misconduct that...

Six from Texas Awarded Guggenheim Fellowships

The John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation awarded its 2020 Guggenheim Fellowships to four writers, a photographer and a composer from Texas. Five of the...

Small Moments of Life in the Face of “Everest”

Austin Opera scales the musical and dramatic peaks of the sleek, tension-filled "Everest"

Julius Eastman to The Fullest

When minimalist composer Julius Eastman died in 1990, the 49-year-old had been homeless for nearly a decade. He'd long lost most of his possessions,...

KMFA Commissions a ‘Sound Garden’ from Artist Steve Parker

A grouping of cacti hooked up to contact mics and a "biosonification device." A large assemblage of salvaged brass instruments that are activated by...

A New Musical Homage to Jay DeFeo’s Monumental Painting, “The Rose”

In the 1950s, Bay Area artist Jay DeFeo was a pivotal figure in San Francisco's lively and ultimately influential community of artists, poet, and jazz...

Live on Stage, but Online, the Miró Quartet Plays All of...

Slowly, responsibly, and surely, the Miró Quartet is mounting their virtual return to the live stage. Beginning July 16 the Miró will be continuing its...

A Musical Map of Resilience: Jordi Savall’s ‘The Routes of Slavery’

The idea of ignoring an entire peoples’ humanity is, and will always be, a monstrous paradox. And yet, when Portugal's first mass slaving expedition...

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